Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Please read if you ride the Media/Elwyn Line and expect to in the future.

Media/Elwyn Line Commuters,

If you rely on the Media/Elwyn line for your commute to University City, 30th Street Station, Center City or beyond, you'll understand the importance of keeping this service running without disruption.  I know I certainly do and am in the process of contacting regional lawmakers to express the importance of this line and the need to support the PA Transportation Bill that will fund critical repair.

Last weekend I contacted Media's State Representative, Tom Killion who told me he supports this bill and is working to get others to do the same.  During that conversation, I learned that State Representative, Steve Barrar is NOT, for what he has stated as an unfair increase in the gasoline and diesel tax. “We’re talking about a 28.5 cent increase on gas and a 38.5 cent increase on diesel,” he said. “Can you imagine what [the increase in diesel] is going to do to the cost of deliveries?” CBS Philly website.
More Traffic if Media/Elwyn Line isn't repaired

I certainly understand his position, but if this highly used passenger line is shut down, the overflow of people who would then have to drive downtown would make a bad situation on the Blue Route and I-95 that much worse....if you can imagine that.  Not to mention the added congestion on secondary roads leading out to highways.  In addition, a lot of people in his district also rely on this line, which I think also needs to be made clear.  Less cars, less traffic, less fuel......easy math.

Two years ago the parking lot at the Elwyn train station was enlarged to accommodate more commuters, a lot of which are coming from the western part of the county.  It's also the reason why Septa has plans(someday) to build a station and parking garage at the Wawa location by Franklin Mint. Septa is becoming relied on more, not less!  As a matter of fact, it should be restored to go all the way out to West Chester. More on that in the future.





The most immediate need for repair, as stated by Septa, is the trestle that spans Crum Creek and links Swarthmore to Wallingford. I had to look at this for myself and took a hike down there to see what I could find.  I'm not a structural engineer, but a few pictures illustrate the need for repair work.  I've never seen concrete footings that hold up a bridge, bound by what looks like a patch work of metal rods.

I plan to a contact Representative Barrar to discuss with him how vitally important this form of transportation is.  In the mean time, you may want to reach out to him too:
Please Click Here to see if you reside in the 160th Legislative District.
E-mail: parep160@aol.com
Facebook: Facebook.com/RepBarrar District OfficeOne Beaver Valley Road (at the intersection of Route 202 and Naamans Creek Road)
Chadds Ford, PA 19317-9012
610-358-5925
Fax: 610-358-5933

21 comments:

  1. Tedman, thank you. There are many Media residents who use the Media/Elwyn line every day. Whether you are elected or not, your advocacy is appreciated.

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  2. This will be probably the first time I have disagreed with you. If Septa equipment, facilities, and structures require repairs, it should be paid for by Septa. The costs should not be the burden of those who do not use it. If fares need to go up, so be it. My gas prices for not using it should not go up. In the same way, I do not believe that those who rely on a rail system should bear the cost of road repairs. If they take the bus, that is a different story.

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    1. I don't have children, but I am forced to subsidize other childrens' education via property taxes. It's about quality of life issues that may or may not be a direct benefit to the individual burdened with the tax. Overall it is a benefit to have an educated population as it is a benefit to have reliable alternative means of transportation.

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    2. If only the Septa customers funded the system then the cost of fares would be prohibitive. What you're saying sounds nice; everybody should pay for what they use, but it's just not pragmatic. Besides, more is involved than the transportation itself; the whole local economy would suffer. Could you imagine if there were no publicly subsidized transportation system and some private companies filled the void? You talk about a joke, base fare would be like $25 and you wouldn't be able to go anywhere remotely out of the way.

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    3. Hey Richard Gambrill, then why should SEPTA riders be forced to subsidize YOUR roads? Maybe you'd like to pay a $15 toll every time you hop on the blue route in the morning.

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    4. I like Richard's approach, so let's apply it across the board. We should toll all roadways and have drivers pay by the mile to fund the infrastructure. And we should put a realistic market price on gas, which would include military funding for operations in the middle east, clean up costs for BP, etc. As Richard said, "The costs should not be the burden of those who do not use it." If I don't drive anywhere, why is my income tax subsidizing gas prices?

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    5. Anonymous from 10:39 AM: The public education system is a whole different topic that you do not want me to get started on. Nothing like state run schools to indoctrinate our children to be dependent on the state.

      Phillyboy: A number of private transit companies competing for business would actually drive costs down.

      Anonymous from 12:40 PM: I was led to believe that we are all paying too much for gas while oil companies are reporting record profits. Are you saying that the opposite is true? And if your income is subsidizing gas prices, then I fully agree with your closing statement. As for road tolls, if the tolls go directly back into the maintenance of said road, then I am all for them.

      Also, for those who are concerned that about property values going down, there would be a legitimate reason to have your property taxes subsidize the rail system. Talk to your borough council member. I'll try and talk Upper Providence council members out of it.

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    6. Hey Anonymous 11:53 AM: Did you read my entire post? I said those who use the rail system as opposed to the roads should not be responsible for the roads. However, SEPTA buses do use the roads.

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    7. @Richard: I'd love to see how state run schools indoctrinate our children to be dependent on the state.

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    8. here we go.....arguing about who should pay for what....in the long run, Septa benefits EVERYONE. It lessens the burdens of the roads (which in the long run lessens the cost of the upkeep). I am happy that all the people who rely on Septa are not FURTHER clogging up the Blue Route and 95. Come on.....it's a no brainer as far as i am concerned. FIX IT! SOON!

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  3. "Vital" is putting it lightly. Our public transportation system is light years behind countries in Europe and Asia. This along with our roadways needs serious attention. All though I agree with many in asking how it will be funded.

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  4. The transportation bill coming up to vote soon in the state house would fund primarily roads, and also mass transit. PennDOT has a good site showing the projects that would move forward with this funding (roads and transit): dotdecade.pa.gov/

    Without transportation funding, we will all be faced with poorer roads, more closed bridges and impacts to businesses. Also, if the Media line is discontinued (as Septa is planning to do if funding is not provided), the desireability (aka property values) in and around Media would be significantly impacted.

    I appreciate Tedman's attention to this matter, and urge those of you who feel this is important to contact your state house representative soon. The vote is likely next week. (The state senate passed the bill by large majority last spring.)

    By the way, Richard's argument conveys the sentiment in the rural regions of the state, that folks don't want fund mass transit if they don't use it. I can understand that. However, it is probably cheaper to maintain transit than increase the highway capacity to get all those folks in and out of the city.

    By the way, Septa's current funding is embarrasingly lower than that of comparable cities systems (DC, Boston, etc). Without good mass transit Philly would be a decidedly second rate city.

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  5. If the bill includes funds for road improvement, I am fine with it. The original post led me to believe that there was going to be a per gallon tax on gas specifically to fund the the improvement of mass transit.

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  6. What is Joe Hackett's position? He represents the Nether Providence side of Media.

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  7. My family relies on this line frequently ... Drexel student, connect from Bolt/Mega buses from NY & Penn State ... This line is popular ... try to find parking around Media/Moylan stops ...

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  8. Wow - Tedman first shared this news by lambasting current council for discussing issue before sending letter to state agencies. Guess it is a complicated issue after all.

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  9. Richard we've been down that private companies will lower prices..Penn Central !

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  10. This most likely would not be such a huge fiscal issue if our state legislators fought the feds a little harder to toll Route 80 across the state. Route 80 is more than 50% commercial traffic and would greatly subsidize costs to the weakening transportation infrastructure, as well as knock a dent into public trans. funding
    Why aren't we barking up that tree?

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  11. the increased tax is too high. it would cause everything to go up-- your groceries, personal deliveries, and, most obviously, your gas. 28c a gallon would be a $5 increase on each fill-up for me. if you figure in how much stores are going to have to charge to overcome the added cost of delivery, this transportation bill does not make sense. especially when so many are under or unemployed.

    media-elwyn needs to be fixed and expanded, but there has got to be a more practical solution. this transportation bill is not the only answer.

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  12. Apartments on site. That might mean more crime. Apartments getting broken into and getting robbed. You no right now the mall has a very high crime and drug rate. First thing they need to do is get security right. The stores in the mall are getting ripped off and getting robbed every day and fights breaking out all the time. The mall has a very high thief rate. They need to bring in the state police in like all the other mall have. What do you think.

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    1. Michael Jordan, MediaNovember 7, 2013 at 10:22 AM

      I go to Christiana Mall a lot. The Apple Store has two strapping Delaware state troopers, packing heat, in their store. I dare the thieves and thugs to try anything. Safest mall I go to. Bruce E. Toll is going to make his investment at GRM on the same model. Security first.

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