Thursday, March 1, 2018

Potentially BIG CHANGES in store with how we use and interact with the Media Trolley

Two track concept proposed for modernization of the Septa trolley system in Media, PA

If you’ve been on a trolley or light-rail system that was built in the last ten years, you immediately notice the modernization of the equipment, payment options, stations, and accessibility, at least compared to what we have here in Media.  Septa has run the Local 101 Trolley service through Media, the same way, for over 100 years, but there are plans on the horizon to dramatically change that from what we’re used to.

No, the trolley won't be taken away for driverless transportation, but it will be enhanced to better suit the needs of Septa, passengers and the way small communities interact with public transportation.  One of the biggest drawbacks for State Street during heightened times of use, is the challenge drivers have with maneuvering around the Media trolley that goes right down the middle of the street.  With parked cars on State St, it makes for a daunting and sometimes regrettable experience when trying to squeeze through a lane not much wider than a large car.  Large vehicles and delivery trucks? Almost impossible, and that causes A LOT of unneeded congestion.  


There’ll be a lot of discussion about this, but here are some interesting concepts and possibilities of how all drawbacks can be re-worked.  One of which would include two sets of tracks down State Street that would allow the trolley to behave in the same manner as vehicles.  Others include platform scenarios and more esthetically pleasing trolley stop boarding areas.


Another concept for the Media Trolley

13 comments:

  1. This is a horrible idea , looks nice but you are taking a huge amount of parking away from the business's and that is not a good idea. What would this accomplish , the drivers need to learn how to drive better. I have lived here for 45 year's and I have never had problems with the trolleys

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  2. Aren't 75 percent of the people coming into town on the trolley coming for their court date. Let's stop it at Monroe and make them exercise. Lower hypertension and diabetes incidents. Lower healthcare costs

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    1. Why stop with the people coming in on the trolley? If you live in Media, you can walk wherever you need to go. No parking on State Street. No more worries. Make everyone walk. Lower hypertension and TYPE 2 diabetes incidents. Lower healthcare costs.

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    2. What about people that are disabled? It would be nice to walk but not everyone is able, you have to include everyone, not just those that can walk distances.

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    3. I live in town and I'm disabled. Nice, well thought out input.

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    4. 75%?
      sounds made up to me.
      Trolly runs 7 days a week about 18 hours a day..nice try But fake news..

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  3. Completely agree that this is a horrible idea. Absolutely mindless. The issues this would cause are wholly predictable which makes it certain to pass given the thoughtlessness of local leadership. The gumming up of Media continues.

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  4. Looks good to me! Less congestion and nicer trolleys. I do wonder how much of the planning is exclusively done by SEPTA and the DVRPC, and how much the Borough has to do with it.

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  5. I have lived in Media for 35 years and the trolley is not cute any more. When I am coming into Media and see that trolley on State Street, I say forget it. I don't feel like dealing with it and drive elsewhere for what I need or want. I don't want to risk my car trying to squeeze over to let it pass. So the merchants must loose business, at least mine they do. The trolley should stop at Monroe Street. I see very few people ever getting off the thing anyway. If you want to help the businesses, you should stop the trolley from disturbing the street.

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  6. I started riding the Trolley every day since 1981, that's when the new Trolleys built by Kawasaki were introduced to SEPTA. The intersection of State Street and Providence Road did not have traffic lights until late 1980's. Before that it was the Honor System (Can you imagine?) honor system what's that?!

    The problem with State Street is it has parking on both sides of the street, the Trolley rides in the middle (it can't turn left or right) and unless everyone starts buying smaller cars (I don't see that happening) the sidewalks would have to be made a foot and a half narrower on both sides to accommodate traffic flow. That is not as bad as it sounds if you consider many of the sidewalks in town need repair or replaced anyway. I walk through Media 5 days a week and know that it is not possible to walk through town without having navigate the uneven, crumbling sidewalks with gaps and drain pipes etc sticking up. Several years back Media Borough paid for paver bricks installed along the perimeter of every walk way but not the actual part we walk on.

    Widen the street, or restrict parking but whatever you do don't stop the Trolleys from coming into the Town of Media. Many people rely on this mode of transportation and it is one of the few towns in the country that still has this transportation feature in it. Not everyone is driving nor can drive. We need more public transportation not less of it. (Think of it as less crowded roadways)

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  7. Anon 5:18 you have some real history and valid points please let our esteemed borough manger know about all the buckled sidewalks. Perhaps instead of spending thousands trying to stop a typical infrastructure project I.e third street bridge redirect some money towards what makes media a stand out among other towns- that being a walkable town with sidewalks that are intact

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  8. As a visitor, and being run off the street by an oncoming trolley, I'm in favor of either two sets of tracks or none at all. Perhaps there is an empty lot on either end of town, where people can park their vehicles and ride into town.

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  9. The trolley does not bring any revenue to Media. It really is a deteriorate to come shop there. Who feels like fighting it to get by? As for the handicap, they still have to walk after they get off the trolley to get anywhere. Which I do see them doing. So why not stop it at Monroe Street?

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